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 Affordable Care Act - New Forms

            In 2010 Congress passed the Affordable Care Act.  Beginning in 2014, there will be new reporting requirements for all individual taxpayers due to this law. 

             Several new forms will be issued to taxpayers this year and next year:

             Form 1095-A:  If you purchased your health insurance through any federal or state health insurance exchange, this form should be mailed to you by January 31, 2015.  Make sure you provide this form to us, since this information is required, if applicable to you, in order to prepare a complete and accurate return.

             Form 1095-B:  This form will be from an insurance company and will report proof of minimum essential coverage so covered taxpayers can avoid penalties.  This form is optional for 2014, so if it applies to you, you may or may not receive this form in 2015, but you will receive one in 2016.

             Form 1095-C:  This form will be from employers to show employee’s proof of coverage.  This form is also optional for 2014, but required to be filed in 2016 for the 2015 filing year.  (If your employer is not subject to the employer mandate – under 50 full time employees – then they will not be required to file this form.)

             If you receive any of these forms, they must be included with your tax information so that we can file a complete and accurate return.  If you do not receive these forms, we will be asking you several new questions this year such as:   Did you have health insurance?  Who provided your coverage?  Were there any gaps in your coverage during the calendar year?  Were all of your dependents covered?

             One last word of caution, if you purchased your health insurance through an exchange and received Premium Reduction Credits, you could be required to pay back part of your Premium Reduction Credits with your tax return if your income is greater than the estimate you used when obtaining your insurance.

             We thank you for your business.

Tax Alerts
Tax Briefing(s)

New IRS guidance fills in several more pieces of the Code Sec. 199A passthrough deduction puzzle. Taxpayers can generally rely on all of these new final and proposed rules.


The IRS has issued interim guidance on the excise tax payable by exempt organizations on remuneration in excess of $1 million and any excess parachute payments made to certain highly compensated current and former employees in the tax year. The excise tax imposed by Code Sec. 4960 is equal to the maximum corporate tax rate on income (currently 21 percent).


The IRS has provided safe harbors for business entities to deduct certain payments made to a charitable organization in exchange for a state or local tax (SALT) credit. A business entity may deduct the payments as an ordinary and necessary business expenses under Code Sec. 162 if made for a business purpose. Proposed regulations that limit the charitable contribution deduction do not affect the deduction as a business expense.


The Treasury and IRS have issued final regulations for determining the inclusion under Code Sec. 965 of a U.S. shareholder of a foreign corporation with post-1986 accumulated deferred foreign income. Code Sec. 965 imposes a "transition tax" on the inclusion. The final regulations retain the basic approach and structure of the proposed regulations, with certain changes.


The IRS has issued its annual revisions to the general procedures for ruling requests, technical memoranda, determination letters, and user fees, as well as areas on which the Associate Chief Counsel offices will not rule. The revised procedures are generally effective January 2, 2019.


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